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THE BEST OF - 60 and 70 - part 125
Kondycja:
Dodane: 04/05/2009
Rozmiar: 110.55 MB
Uploader: Anonimowy
seed(ów): 3
leecher(ów): 2
Pobrane: 6





Ocena: N/A

PART 125



               
  THE ABYSSINIANS   -  Satta Massa Gana
  ANGELIQUE KIDJO  -   Zelie  (influenced by the traditional songs of Togo)
                       





            Abyssinians - Satta Massagana (lyric)

            There is a land far, far away  
            Where there's no night, there's only day
            Look into the book of life and you will see
            That there's a land far, far away
            That there's a land far, far away.  
            The King of Kings and the Lord of Lords  
            Sits upon his throne and He rules us all  
            Look into the book of life and you will see
            That He rules us all
            That He rules us all.
            There is a land...

            Satta Massagana Ahamlack, ulaghize
            Satta Massagana Ahamlack, ulaghize

            Ulaghize (repeat & fade)


       This song includes phrases sung in Amharic, a language of Ethiopia.




       Authentic African music - the traditional music of the black peoples of Africa - is little known abroad. The non-African listener can find the music strange, difficult, and unattractive; and therefore often concludes that it is not of interest.The African concept of music is totally different to the Western one though. Traditional African musicians do not seek to combine sounds in a manner pleasing to the ear. Their aim is simply to express life in all of its aspects through the medium of sound. The African musician does not merely attempt to imitate nature by music, but reverses the procedure by taking natural sounds, including spoken language, and incorporate them into the music. To the uninitiated this may result in cacophony, but in fact each sound has a particular meaning. To be meaningful, African music must be studied within the context of African life.
       The history of Africa and the movement of people into, out of and across Africa would indicate that many a cross-fertilisation of musical influences affected African music. In spite of slavery and colonialism - or maybe because of it - the influence of African music has spread to every corner of the world and is flourishing back home.
       In the USA, African music was virtually eliminated by slave owners. Slaves were mainly imported from the Mandingo, Wolof, Fanti, Ashanti, Yoruba and Calabari tribes of West Africa. Tribal groups were split up and drums were originally prohibited, but the American banjo is based on the West African gourd guitar. African work songs appropriately survived and slowly evolved into blues. New European instruments were taken up by the blacks. Jazz, which transformed European structured music with African techniques of interweaving rhythm and melodies, call-and-response patterns and 'vocalising' with instruments, became the first all-American music form. Originally jazz was dance music, a fusion of ragtime piano style with blues, spirituals and the brass music of marching bands common at the start of the twentieth century. African-American dance music was also kept alive in the form of R&B. The R&B idioms fused with country music and ballads to become rock and roll. After jazz, rock and roll proved to be the most influential fusion but as it spread across the globe, it soon became ‘white’ music. Soul also developed out of R&B fused with gospel music. Many of the best soul musicians developed their talents in church gospel choirs. Funk and rap followed.









                 TOTAL LIST  (19.10.2008 )


         
                 HISTORY OF POP AND ROCK MUSIC
                  The Roots of Rock 'n' Roll:  



        ***********************************************************************************                              
          01. AFRICAN TRADITIONAL MUSIC   ( DEEP ROOTS )  


           African music has been a major factor in the shaping of what we know today as blues and jazz. These styles have all borrowed from African rhythms and sounds, brought over the Atlantic ocean by slaves.



   THE ABYSSINIANS   -  Satta Massa Gana
   ANGELIQUE KIDJO -  ZELIE  (influenced by the traditional songs of Togo        
 



        ***********************************************************************************
          02.  BLUES  

           Important source of modern rock'n'roll, absolutely essential to the sound we think of as 60's rock, was, first, the Blues. Blues has evolved from an unaccompanied vocal music and oral traditions of African-American slaves (imported from West Africa; prin*censored*lly present day Mali, Senegal, the Gambia and Ghana)
          Blues began as the music of black sharecroppers in the poor cotton-farming region of the Mississippi Delta, and traveled north to Chicago with the sharecroppers as thousands of them moved north in search of a better life. It was in Chicago that the blues went from acoustic solo guitar music to electric guitar-electric bass-drums combos. Muddy Waters, Little Milton, B.B. King, and Howlin' Wolf were just a few of these important Chicago blues artists.

       
        BLIND WILLIE JOHNSON  -  TROUBLE WILL SOON BE OVER   (1927)
        JIMMIE RODGERS   -   BLUE YODEL No. 1 (T For Texas)  (1928)
        JIMMIE RODGERS   -   WAITING FOR A TRAIN   (1928)
        LEAD BELLY -  LORD LORD LORD   (1929)
        SKIP JAMES  -  HARD TIME KILLING FLOOR BLUES  (1931)
        SKIP JAMES & ALVIN YOUNGBLOOD HART -  ILLINOIS BLUES (1931)
        ROBERT JOHNSON  -  SWEET HOME CHICAGO   (1936)
        ROBERT JOHNSON  -  LOVE IN VAIN    (1937)
        ROBERT JOHNSON  -  CROSS ROAD BLUES   (1937)
        LEAD BELLY -  PICK A BALE OF COTTON  (1945)
        LEAD BELLY - TAKE THIS HAMMER  (1945)        
        CARMEN TWILLIE - GIVE ME FREEDOM
        SISTER ROSETTA THARPE - UP ABOVE MY HEAD
        JOHN LEE HOOKER  -  TUPELO, MISSISSIPPI
        JOHN LEE HOOKER -  I'LL NEVER GET OUT OF THESE BLUES ALIVE
        SKIP JAMES  -  ALL NIGHT LONG
        DR. ISAIAH ROSS  -  FEEL SO GOOD
        BIG MAMA THORNTON  - HOUND DOG  (1952)
        MUDDY WATERS -  YOU CAN'T LOSE WHAT YOU AIN'T NEVER HAD        
        BIG JOE WILLIAMS - BABY PLEASE DON'T GO  (1963)
        MUDDY WATERS - GOT MY MOJO WORKING (1963)
        WILLIE DIXON - WEAK BRAIN AND NARROW MIND (1964)
        JOHN LEE HOOKER - I'M LEAVING  (1964)
        J.B.LENOIR -  I FEEL SO GOOD
        J.B.LENOIR - SLOW DOWN
        LUCINDA WILLIAMS - HARD TIME KILLING FLOOR BLUES (Skip James)(2003)
        BONNIE RAITT  -  DEVIL GOT MY WOMAN (Skip James) (2003)
        CASSANDRA WILSON  -  VIETNAM BLUES  (J.B.Lenoir)   (2003
        ODETTA  -  JIM CROW BLUES  -  originally performed by Lead Belly
        JAMES BLOOD ULMER & ALISON KRAUSS - SITTIN' ON TOP OF THE WORLD
        GARLAND JEFFREYS - WASHINGTON DC HOSPITAL CENTER BLUES (Skip James)(2003)
        DAVID HONEYBOY EDWARDS - GAMBLIN' MAN
        RUTHIE FOSTER -  UP ABOVE MY HEAD (Sister Rosetta Tharpe)(2007)



         The classic female blues spanned from 1920 to 1929 with its peak from 1923 to 1925 ; most popular of these singers were Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Mamie Smith, Ethel Waters, Ida Cox, Victoria Spivey, Sippie Wallace, Alberta Hunter, Clara Smith, Edith Wilson, Trixie Smith, Lucille Hegamin and Bertha “Chippie” Hill. Hundreds of others recorded including Lizzie Miles, Sara Martin, Rosa Henderson, Martha Copeland, Bessie Jackson (Lucille Bogan), Edith Johnson, Katherine Baker, Margaret Johnson, Hattie Burleson, Madlyn Davis, Ivy Smith, Alberta Brown, Gladys Bentley, Billie and Ida Goodson, Fannie May Goosby, Bernice Edwards and Florence Mills.



        NATALIE COLE- St.LOUIS BLUES - originally performed by W.C Handy (1914)
        BESSIE SMITH  -  St. LOUIS BLUES  (1925)
        MAMIE SMITH  -  JAIL HOUSE BLUES  (1929)
        ETHEL WATERS - DARKIES NEVER DREAM  (1934)
        MAMIE SMITH  -  HARLEM BLUES  (1939)
        MAMIE SMITH  - LORD! LORD! LORD!  (1939)
        MAMIE SMITH  -  I'LL DO EVERYTHING FOR LOVE  (1940)
        ETHEL WATERS  - TAKING A CHANCE ON LOVE   (1942)
        ETHEL WATERS  -  A THING CALLED JOE  (1942)
        ETHEL WATERS &  COUNT BASIE   -  QUICKSAND  (1943)  
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Trackerhttp://tracker.thepiratebay.org/announce
Kategoria:Muzyka » Teledyski/Koncerty
Dodane04/05/2009 17:05:51
Ostatnie Uaktualnienie25/09/2012 08:09:26
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